American Bully Facts – Is The American Bully A Pitbull?

American Bully Facts – Is The American Bully A Pitbull?

 

Is The American Bully A Pitbull?

Is the American Bully a Pitbull? This common question gets asked a lot, and the answer is No; the American Bully is an entirely different breed than the Pitbull Terrier.

There appears to be a vast misconception surrounding the two breeds where people mistake them to be the same. 

In this blog, we will unfold the differences between the two breeds, helping to give our readers a better understanding of this topic.

 

Pitbull vs American Bully 

First of all, let’s look at a brief summary of the two breeds and understand a little about their history. 

 

Pitbulls 

Pitbulls, or Pitbull-type dogs, originated in the early 19th century. Pitbulls were a cross between Bulldog-type dogs and terriers, giving them the name Bull Terrier. 

They were initially used on farms as herding dogs and as a form of protection for livestock. 

Unfortunately, they were also used in cruel sports such as Bull baiting and dog fighting, where they would put the dogs in pits and place bets on who would win.  

However, these cruel sports are not related to the Pitbulls that are around today. Thankfully, dog fighting and Bull baiting are illegal in most countries.  

During the 20th century, Pitbulls became extremely popular, especially the American Pitbull Terrier. 

The American Pitbull terrier became a national mascot in America. It was used on posters for WW1 and WW2, with the country proudly naming them “America’s dog.”

The American Pit Bull Terrier has a good nature. They are amusing and highly loyal family pets. American Pitbulls are always eager to please their owner, making them very obedient when appropriately trained from a young age.

American Pitbulls can be very protective of their owners and property. They are very friendly but have a fantastic ability to read situations. 

American Pitbulls are not aggressive toward humans when socialized and trained correctly (just like all dogs); however, it isn’t uncommon for them to naturally show aggression towards other animals. Training from an early age and plenty of socializing with other animals is essential to prevent this undesirable trait. 

 

 

American Bully 

The American Bully is a fairly new breed that started in the late 80s and early 90s. 

At this time, they were a blend between the American Pitbull and the American Staffordshire terrier.

Breeding the two breeds together created a thicker-boned dog with a lower drive and less dog aggression. 

A breeder called Dave Wilson, also the founder of Razor’s edge bloodline, played a significant role in creating the American Bully. 

He explains how Amstaff and Pitbull breeders blending the two breeds would market the dogs as “Bullier dogs” and use phrases such as “putting the Bull back in the Terrier.” These phrases were used to describe the thick bone substance of the dog and the blockier head shape and later became the influence of the name American Bully. 

Other major kennels in the early creation of the American Bully were Gotti Line and Grey Line. They and Razors Edge collaborated and created some incredible Bully dogs that kick-started the breed worldwide.

Dave Wilson later became the president of the American Bully Kennel Club. This registry recognised the American Bully as its own breed.

During the early 2000s, breeders added other breeds to the American Bully, such as Mastiffs and Bulldog variations, which eventually resulted in four categories: Pocket, Standard, Classic and Extra Large. 

Pocket Bully

The Pocket Bully is the smallest of the American Bully family. 

Males Stand between 14 -17 inches at the withers, and females stand between 13-16 inches at the withers.

Standard Class

The Standard American Bully is slightly taller than the pockets, with males standing at 17 – 20 inches at the withers and Females standing at 16 – 19 inches at the withers.

Classic Class

The Classic American Bully is an amendment to the standard which a Classic Bully is determined by its overall structure and build. Both sex dogs with lighter body frames and less overall mass, but still exhibit “Bully” traits.

Extra Large Class

The XL Bully is the biggest of the American Bully breed.

Males stand at 20 inches (51 cm) – 23 inches (57 cm) at the withers.

Females stand at 19 inches (48 cm) – 22 inches (54 cm) at the withers.

Today’s American bully is a companion breed with a low drive and great affection for humans. They are confident dogs that are eager to please their owner, and any kind of aggression toward humans and other dogs is rare and extremely undesirable. 

 

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